Be a Supporter!

theBLURtheBLUR

Main News Favorites Reviews Stats
Follow theBLUR
theBLUR
  • Add Friend
Age / Gender:
28, Male
Location:
Lawrence,KS & STL,MO
Joined:
12/12/07
All Stats >

If you don't have constructive feedback, then feed your feedback back up your backside.

User Statshot

Community Stats
Level 7 Blank Slate
Normal Whistle
Ranked as Police Officer

Contact Info / Websites

Latest News

How to Make Good Characters

2008-01-12 15:34:03 by theBLUR

If you have been referred to this page in a review, I think you could use some improvement in your flash. That doesn't mean that you suck at life, but it might be worth considering.

Step 1: Introduce Characters
The key to a successful flash is building an audience that appreciates your work. To draw people to your work, develop your characters so that people can relate to them. The first step is to identify who your main characters are. A great way to do this and develop them at the same time is to introduce them performing acts similar to what your audience would expect of that character. For example, if your flash is about a game character, portray the game character doing what that character does in the game from which they originate. This allows game fans to connect with your character in the same way that they connected with that same character in the game. If your character is an average Joe, then you need to make that character act like your audience. This allows people to connect to the actions of that character. By seeing similarities between the character and their own lives, they will grow interested. If your character is more abstract, then you need to make the character catchy. When you add color and depth to the characters, you create imagery that your fans will use to connect to the character. Try to make your unique character like something familiar so people know what they are seeing. While the unknown can be inspiring, people have trouble connecting with completely new things, so you need to find some way to relate your characters to something else. The most important thing to remember is to keep your introductions organized. If you introduce five characters, your viewers expect all 5 characters to appear throughout the flash unless you give a reason for any number of characters to depart. That means that you need to think out your flash and decide how many characters you need and what roles they will play throughout the flash.

Step 2: Develop Characters
Half of character development happens when the character is introduced. The other half you decide in your plot. For each character, ask yourself a few questions. Is this character dynamic or static? Does your character play a major role or a minor role? Try to come up with a history of your character and a thought process that explains that character's actions. For example, having one character always be the voice of impulse and another be the voice of reason creates consistent roles for each character. This gives them personality and purpose. The only time you should change this is in the resolution of your plot. If your characters are dynamic, then they should change after a major crisis or learning experience. That allows them to keep their purpose during most of the plot and keeps your viewers connected to them. When a character changes, that character must have rationale for changing. Spontaneous changes confuse and bother your audience. That's bad. Once a character is introduced, you should try to stick with the first impression given by the character when introduced. If that character seems stubborn, keep that character stubborn all the time. This reinforces the audience's perception of that character which helps you connect to your audience.

Step 3: Resolve Characters
Not all characters should be active members of your flash. Sometimes, a character needs to die or depart from the scene. You need to create reasons that would fit into the plot you created in your flash. For instance, if you make a flash about nine siblings, you need to give them all roles and personalities. Sometimes, you can create personalities off the screen by introducing any number of characters by using their name and describing them in a few words. When they finally arrive on the scene, you audience already knows how that character should behave. You can use these descriptions to end character involvement in your plot as well. For example, if you have a plot with nine siblings, and one of them is insane, you can flash an image of an asylum and never mention that character again.

THE BLACKLIST
The below list is about artists who have some serious work to do. Please vote 0 on all of their submissions until they are off this list. They will get off this list when their flash quality improves.

absent (I know you're a mod, but the Adolf Hitler Pokemon series, come on dude)
40ox
AfroUnderscoreStud
BigFuzzyKitten
Billy-Bean
Clefto
Death619
Erect-Vagina
etc...
F4Gg0t
Fag
FatBadger
FatKidWitAJetPak
Fleek
fleekinator
feeksbrother
fleeksdad
forty-two
fuck-y0u
Fubster
Heil
inversecoma
Joeypwnsjoo
JujubeLock
Kberkag
KittyKrew
LordZeebmork
Milfr3d
nigss
nrnr
Orangebeef
Paco96
Paradox
Peach-Socom
peanutbutterclawk
PepsiClock
qwer1234
Ravec
Reed
s0und
SAK
SocomSquad
Strength
supamariosbros
t-t-troll
TheCrimsonChin
TNOAT
Vegaz
VeinDigger
ZombieArmy

How to Make Good Characters